Student Projects

Student Projects

Graduate Student Projects

Jesi Bennett

On Friday, May 6th, the opening reception was held for a new exhibition about Hōkūleʻa’s Mālama Honua Worldwide Voyage.
“This exhibition is called Hōkūleʻa Mālama Honua. It’s part of a month-long celebration that the Honolulu Museum of Art is putting on. The focus for the month of May is to celebrate what Hōkūleʻa is doing around the world, and then also to bring attention back to it as it starts to make its way back to Oceania,” says Jesi Lujan Bennett, curator for the exhibition.
“A lot of exhibitions talk about Hōkūleʻa as the catalyst for the Hawaiian rennaisance, which is important, but in this space we’re looking at the contemporary voyage that’s happening. So looking at the Worldwide Voyage and its message of Mālama Honua, so how do we take care of the Earth and our environment, and with this exhibition, its a small space but Iʻm hoping that my co-curator, Annemarie Aweau Paikai, and I have put on a dynamic show where people can touch things, see things, and connect to Hōkūleʻa and the Worldwide Voyage in ways that maybe they canʻt do at home,” explains Bennett. “We have a selfie station, we have videos playing and photography and all of it is to hopefully inspire people by the voyage and also have them think more critically about how they’re living sustainably in their own space.”
“The exhibition is gonna be held through the month of May here at the Honolulu Museum of Art School, May 6th to May 29th, up here second floor in the mezzanine. It’s free and all ages are welcome,” encourages Bennett.

Links to the Oiwi TV article and interview with Jesi

http://oiwi.tv/hokulea/hokulea-malama-honua-exhibition/

https://vimeo.com/165977707

Undergraduate Student Participation

Paul Iseri and Briana Wagstaff, two undergraduate students in the Spring 2016 Museum Interpretations course (AMST 457/ART481) assisted Jesi by creating an exhibition flyer, handout, and poster for the exhibition entrance. The Museum Interpretations course offers students the option to choose a practical project or a research project as part of the final course requirements.

Erika organized and moderated the panel, “In and Out of Harajuku: Fashioning Culture and Identity”. The panelists of “In & Out of Harajuku: Fashioning Culture and Identity” discussed a range of issues associated with Harajuku’s subculture fashion and raise by the exhibition “Harajuku: Tokyo Street Fashion” (Honolulu Museum of Art, 11/19/15 – 4/3/16).

Panel Discussion: Sunday, March 13, 2016, 2:00-4:00 pm
Room 101, Art Building
2535 McCarthy Mall, University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa

PANELISTS

Sara Oka, Textiles Curator and Exhibition Curator of Harajuku: Tokyo Street Fashion, Honolulu Museum of Art

Angela Ni, Junior Graphic Designer, Honolulu Museum of Art; Co-Founder of JfashionHI, member of the Hawaiʻi Lolita community

Akino Oshiro, UHM MA Sociology Student, Harajuku fashion enthusiast and former participant

Christine Yano, UHM Professor of Anthropology, noted scholar of Japanese “kawaii” culture

MODERATOR

Erika Enomoto, UHM art history student; intern and gallery Docent of Harajuku: Tokyo Street Fashion, Honolulu Museum of Art

Undergraduate Student Participation

Briana Wagstaff, an undergraduate student in the Spring 2016 Museum Interpretations course (AMST 457/ART481) assisted Erika by creating a flyer for the panel discussion. The Museum Interpretations course offers students the option to choose a practical project or a research project as part of the final course requirements.

Working with University of Hawaiʻi Museums and Collections

Jason Foberg created a video for Lyon Arboretum’s cooking program. The class, Soups and Stews, was taught by Alyssa Moreau. Alyssa featured cooking with beans, grains, and vegetables that enhanced the flavors of the fall season. Recipes included Oden Stew with root vegetables, and Taro Stew and homemade broth. Alyssa demonstrated the use of a pressure cooker, enabling shortened cooking time and preserving valuable nutrients. Alyssa provided recipes, samples, and a cooking guide and discuss the nutritional benefits of the foods prepared, and the best storage methods for future use.

[no_team team_type=”below_image” team_image=”1993″ team_name=”Kristin Remington” team_position=”Museum Studies Graduate Certificate Student” team_description=”Kristin Remington is a concurrent graduate student in South & Southeast Asian Art History and Museum Studies. Kristin curated “Fragments & Empire: Cambodian Art from the Angkor Period“ which ran from March 6, 2016 to May 6, 2016 at the John Young Museum of Art. “]

Undergraduate Student Participation

Paul Iseri, an undergraduate student in the Spring 2016 Museum Interpretations course (AMST 457/ART481) assisted Kristin by creating an exhibition flyer and postcard announcement for the exhibition. Two other undergraduate students, Brye Kobayashi and Lauren Tabor helped to edit a diagram used Kristin’s exhibition. The Museum Interpretations course offers students the option to choose a practical project or a research project as part of the final course requirements.

Undergraduate Projects

[no_team team_type=”below_image” team_name=”Theresa Cantero” team_description=”Undergraduate Student”]

[no_team team_type=”below_image” team_name=”Paul Iseri” team_description=”Undergraduate Student”]

[no_team team_type=”below_image” team_name=”Brye Kobayashi & Lauren Tabor” team_description=”Undergraduate Students”]

[no_team team_type=”below_image” team_name=”Chapin Sussman” team_description=”Undergradute Student”]

[no_team team_type=”below_image” team_name=”Briana Wagstaff” team_position=”Undergraduate Student”]